• Fox, S. F., E. Santoyo-Brito, and H. Núñez. 2017. LIOLAEMUS NITIDUS (Shining Tree Iguana). OCULAR SINUS BLEEDING. Herpetological Review 48:651.
  • Santoyo-Brito, E., S. Fox, and H. Núñez. 2018. Age estimation through skeletochronology and mark-recapture of free-living individuals in a population of a high-elevation, viviparous lizard from Chile, Liolaemus leopardinus. Phyllomedusa 17(1): 101-112

Madre con bebes closeupNational Geographic recently posted an article on their website featuring Bad Moms in nature, which summarized how bad the Leopard Tree Iguana (Liolaemus leopardinus) mothers are. Of course, they are bad only by crude human standards. They are wonderfully adapted to their environment according to research by Stanley Fox and past student Enrique Santoyo-Brito. 

SWAN winners

 

Justin Agan recently received two research grants to study possible temperature-induced sex reversal in the GSD Collared Lizard:

--Howard McCarley Award. Southwestern Association of Naturalists.Howard McCarley Award. Southwestern Association of Naturalists.$1000.

--Helen T. and Frederick M. Gaige Award. American Society ofHelen T. and Frederick M. Gaige Award. American Society ofIchthyologists and Herpetologists. $900.

 

Taylor Carlson recently received two research awards to add an eDNA component to her study of the Ringed Salamander in Oklahoma:

--Howard McCarley Student Research Award. Southwestern Association ofHoward McCarley Student Research Award. Southwestern Association ofNaturalists. $1000.

--Bryan P. Glass Student Award in Integrative Biology, Department of Integrative Biology, Oklahoma State University. $650.

Chihuahua dogJustin Agan and coauthors gave an oral presentation entitled "The role of hatchling orange bars in male-male interactions of the Collared Lizard, Crotaphytus collaris" at the 66th annual meeting of the Southwestern Association of Naturalists, held in April in Chihuahua, Mexico. Justin also received a travel award from SWAN for  $682 to attend the meeting.

 

Taylor Carlson and coauthors gave an oral presentation entitled "First documentation of breeding aggregations of the ringed salamander, Ambystoma annulatum, in Oklahoma, USA – Future monitoring and implications for the species’ management" at the 66th annual meeting of the Southwestern Association of Naturalists, held in April in Chihuahua, Mexico. Taylor also received a travel award from SWAN for $682 to attend the meeting.

Jodie2Jodie Wiggins, a doctoral student in the Fox Lab coadvised by Fox and Lovern, graduated in July, 2018, with a PhD. Jodie worked on the research of precocial sexual selection in the Collared Lizard, and produced an outstanding dissertation documenting that male hatdchlings with brighter Hatchling Orange Bars (HOB) postumously produced more offspring, those with greater HOB area had a greater posthumous chance of producing offspring at all, hatchling females significantly preferred to associate with male hatchlings with brighter HOB, and hatchling males with greater HOB area were more aggressive than their counterparts with less ornamentation. In short, all the elements of sexual selection, but in hatchlings, what we call Precocial Sexual Selection. Congratulations, Jodie!